Propolis of the Heart

ne of the most fascinating substances they create is propolis. Propolis is made from a mixture of wax, bee saliva, and saps, nectars, or the like. This often means it has a pine-like smell, since there is little more frustratingly sticky in nature in the Northeast than bloody pine sap. The smell of an active hive, for what it’s worth, is a thing to behold (for the non-allergy prone, I would imagine).

Advertisements

The Arrival of the Bee Box

This past Saturday was a really great day. Adam and I drove to the tiny borough of Hanover, CT (which is chock full of adorable old farm houses) to pick up my two 3 lb. packages of bees with mated queens. It was an hour drive back to our house, and it was interesting to…

Tanks for the Memories

Adam and I are new to well ownership. Our 52 year old house has a well and septic system, despite the municipal water ending a mere 20 feet from our property. To be fair, we’ve rather enjoyed having both a well and a septic tank, even though the septic tank has a HUGE crack across…

The Rat King Race

I’ve noticed recently a larger-than-a-trickle stream of my peers leaving their careers, office positions, and the like to pursue independent employment. And by peers, I mean other young women my age, previously employed in insurance or marketing or some other soul-sucking office position. Two friends are running or setting up bakeries in the state. A…

The Curated Life

First of all, let me state clearly that I hate the term “curate” unless you’re talking about a member of the clergy or someone who spent years in deep dive study and now works at a fucking museum. If someone says they’re a “lifestyle curator” or that they “curate” a certain aesthetic, they’re really just…

Pretty Packages & Packed Schedules

Adam and I have been extraordinarily busy lately. After Simon’s traumatic passing, it only took us a few days to realize we wanted to adopt another dog. Our home, despite being full by any sane person’s measure with two cats and a dog, felt hollow. So, like complete lunatics, we embarked on a 1,000 mile…

The Hundred Pound Hole

Last night, I lost my best friend. Simon was five. Yesterday, I came home from work early due to the snow. Simon was in bed with Adam, who was sleeping off a long night trick. When Adam got up, we bundled the dogs and went for a long walk in the woods behind our house….

On the Paradox of Tolerance

 or: The Violent Pacifist In grad school, I spent quite a lot of time with John Rawls. Not only does his idea of the veil of ignorance help strip away a lot of the bullshit around justice and open avenues for better applied fairness within a reasoned society, but also a good friend (incidentally, still…

Learning to Live Radically

If Only a Bit Twenty-sixteen pushed me ever closer to becoming an outright socialist. Twenty-seventeen is sealing the deal. Maybe I’ve been reading too much Angela Davis of late (that’s not a thing), or perhaps I’ve just had enough. Regardless, I have little desire to continue fully participating in a system that will let its members…

Bees in Winter

This is not a post about bees. On Saturday, January 21, 2017, I geared up in a ridiculous hat that my aunt knitted for me so she could be there in spirit, gathered my mother, another aunt, and a great, feminist friend (who is incidentally also one of the fiercest, smartest women I have the…

On Honey & Harmony

I’ve come to think of honey as akin to bread. Humans cannot sustain on water and flour separately; we must combine flour and water and time (fermentation) to create bread that can nourish. The bees store nectar over time to create the honey that nourishes them specifically.

Why ‘Blackthorn’?

Blackthorn is an ominous word. It conjures images of pain and darkness, the brambles in Sleeping Beauty, or perhaps a pretentiously named manor house in a Gothic romance. The plant itself, prunus spinosa, also called sloe, is native to northern and central Europe, though it has long been grown in eastern North America. It bears its name due to the inch-long thorns it produces alongside snowy white blooms and later, bitter purple-black drupes which can be used to make sloe gin.